Partner Insight: Working from home has wellbeing implications

"The organisation has to set a culture that's appropriate, particularly around mental health"

clock • 1 min read
Partner Insight: Working from home has wellbeing implications

Many employees are keen to continue working from home following the pandemic, but it is important to consider the effect on their wellbeing, says Paula Allen

One of the biggest items on the agenda for most organisations has been the extent to which employees should return to the office once the pandemic has receded. There are compelling arguments on both sides, but it is important to ensure mental health and wellbeing are part of the discussion.

LifeWorks' data indicates that before the pandemic, 71% of employees felt a good sense of belonging with their work, workplace and colleagues. By August 2021 that had fallen to 63% - a significant decline.

LifeWorks' analysis has also shown that work productivity falls on average by almost 30 days per year if someone doesn't have a sense of belonging.

Many more employees are likely to be working from home as we find the new normal after the pandemic. But employers shouldn't assume that that means the new arrangements are automatically ok, says Paula Allen. "There's a lot of positives in terms of people working from home. But there are unintended consequences as well.

Read ebook

"You don't have that sense of connection. We have an issue in our society with isolation to begin with. It impacts the variety you have in your experiences and the opportunity for different stress outlets with your colleagues."

"Most people are not wanting to work at home for reasons of their health and wellbeing; it's because commuting is a pain in the neck and expensive.

"I'm not saying we should just stop working from home, but we need to make sure that we support people appropriately so that their wellbeing is not negatively impacted."

For more on why companies need to be offering comprehensive wellbeing support to their employees, read our exclusive guide

More on Regulation

Clare Moffat, Head of the Intermediary Development & Technical Team at Royal London

Partner Insight: What the new Consumer Duty means for advisers and their clients

The new Consumer Duty will require protection businesses of all sizes to deliver good outcomes for retail customers and advisers should be prepared for the new regulations.

Clare Moffat, Head of the Intermediary Development & Technical Team at Royal London
clock 04 July 2022 • 1 min read
Treasury sub-committee launched to scrutinise financial regulators post-Brexit

Treasury sub-committee launched to scrutinise financial regulators post-Brexit

Additional Financial Services Scrutiny Unit

Georgie Lee
clock 27 June 2022 • 2 min read
FOS appoints new CEO and chief ombudsman

FOS appoints new CEO and chief ombudsman

Replacing Nausicaa Delfas

Ayesha Venkataraman
clock 09 June 2022 • 2 min read

Highlights

The COVER Review June 2022: Pride, Sandy's Story, Consumer Duty and IP for Gen Z

The COVER Review June 2022: Pride, Sandy's Story, Consumer Duty and IP for Gen Z

Now available for members to watch

John Brazier
clock 23 June 2022 • 1 min read
Protection & Technology: Where do we go from here?

Protection & Technology: Where do we go from here?

"The potential for this technology to revolutionise our industry is huge"

Hemma Visavadia
clock 27 June 2022 • 6 min read
Spotlight: Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Spotlight: Alzheimer's disease & dementia

"The underwriting of Alzheimer's disease is relatively straightforward"

John Downes
clock 24 June 2022 • 5 min read